Featured at the Bar-D Ranch

 

Back on Home

Search CowboyPoetry.com

The Latest
     What's New
     Newsletter
        Subscribe (free!)

Be a Part of it All 
     About the BAR-D
     Join us!

The BAR-D Roundup

Cowboy Poetry Collection
     Folks' poems
     Honored Guests
     Index of poems

Poetry Submissions  
    Guidelines
    Current Lariat Laureate

Events Calendar

Cowboy Poetry Week

Featured Topics
    Classic Cowboy Poetry
    Newest Features
        Poets and musicians
        Cowboy poetry topics
        Programs of  interest
        Gathering reports
        In memory
   Who Knows?

Cowboy Life and Links
    Western Memories
    Books about Cowboy Poetry  

The Big Roundup

Link to us!
Give us a holler

Subscribe!

line.GIF (1552 bytes)

 

This is Page 105.

See some past photo entries below.

See an index of all past photos here.

See Page 1 here with the current photos.

 

We welcome your pictures. We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We're looking for vintage photos and contemporary photos: family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo to share, email us for information about sending it to us.


 

Send your photos.

 Email us.

 

 

If you enjoy this feature, you may also be interested in our 
Western Memories Project, the personal recollections— many with photos— contributed by BAR-D visitors.  Your stories and photos are welcome.



We welcome your photos.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

Share your part of the West or the West of your past. To send photos and their descriptions, just email them to us.   


previous  photos

index of all photos



 

April 9, 2012

We saw some of Texan Brenda Butler Hill's work, and asked her to share some for Picture the West. This is part one of her photographs, all taken at brandings. Next week we'll have some of her "pretty loop" images.

Brenda comments on the photographs:

These photos are of Chris Enriquez. Chris and my nephew Kade Butler became friends, thus the connection.

Chris lost his right leg several years ago in an unfortunate accident while working for the 6666 Ranch but refuses to give up. These photos were taken April 2011 at the Happy Heart Branding in Lipscomb County, Texas.


© 2011, Happy Heart Ranch Photography, Brenda Hill

Lane makes every effort to insure that everybody that wants to participate gets that chance. Chris is truly an inspiration and I appreciate Lane for his truly inclusive attitude.


© 2011, Happy Heart Ranch Photography, Brenda Hill

Branding for us in the TX/OK panhandles is a family affair and we try to make sure no one gets left out.
 

This is a father/daughter team that I photographed last year. Jason Pelham and daughter, Jessica, were working together flanking for the first time. Jessica was a freshman at West Texas A&M University when these were taken March 5, 2011 at Heart Ranch Branding in Lipscomb County, Texas. Jason manages the Panhandle Spade Ranch in Canadian, Texas.


©
2011, Happy Heart Ranch Photography, Brenda Hill


© 2011, Happy Heart Ranch Photography, Brenda Hill

Again, our spring work here is a family affair and I love to capture as much of that as I can.
 

And these final images from a 2012 branding by Brenda Butler Hill are of R.j. Vandygriff, well known to many as a popular entertainer, the creator of The Cowboy Ain't Dead Yet!

 
© 2012, Happy Heart Ranch Photography, Brenda Hill


© 2012, Happy Heart Ranch Photography, Brenda Hill

R.j. has received the 2012 Wranger Heritage Award from the National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum for Outstanding Original Composition, for "Keep the Campfire A Burnin'" from Volume III of his series. He'll pick up the award at the Museum's gala in Oklahoma City on April 21, 2012. We asked him for a few words about the show:

I wrote the show to set the story straight about the American cowboy. Hollywood paints a pretty picture of cowboy life but it's not near as romantic as the movies make it.

The one man musical comedy,
The Cowboy Ain't Dead Yet! is a result of rejection. As a cowboy performer I've been rejected by many or most of the big cowboy gatherings...so I thought, well, I'll ride my own trail. Sure glad I did. Going on twenty years now and every year I think this is gonna be my last year to do the show and something happens...

It's a good feeling to walk out on a stage, see a full house and know they came to see what you're doing. It's even better when some old cowboy walks up and says, "Thank ya son for telling our story and tellin' right."

Find more about R.j. Vandygriff and his show at www.cowboyaintdeadyet.com.
 

We asked Brenda Butler Hill to tell us a bit about herself:

Lane and I operate Happy Heart Ranch, a small operation in Lipscomb County.

Over the last 20 years, we have worked for other ranches and day worked quite a bit. My dad was a cowboy and I grew up that way and Lane has cowboyed all his life. I worked in town in accounting many years and started in EMS in 2002.

I've always liked to photograph as a way of recording events. The inspiration to try it on a more serious level came from our friend, Rene Heil, as he progressed in ranch photography. Unfortunately, we lost Rene in July 2011, much too soon. My goal is to pick up where he left off and record as much cowboy heritage as I possibly can.

Just recently, I've begun to write some short stories about our adventures that all speak to the humor in this way of life.

Find more photography and stories at Brenda Butler Hill's web site: happyheartranchphotography.zenfolio.com

 


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


 

April 2, 2012

We met South Dakota cowboy and writer Deanna Nelson at the National Cowboy Poetry Gathering and saw some of her ranch photos on Facebook and asked if she would share some. She sent these photos and captions from the ranch where she works near Murdo:

This is Baby Doll, taken last summer while fighting a bull in a boggy creek. I had dismounted and left Doll on solid ground.


We live right along the White River in Central South Dakota. I captured the cows on the feed ground while fixing the roof on one of the sheds.

A little heifer calf hiding in the shade, her mother and twin sister were resting in the shed.

 

We asked Deanna to tell us something about herself:

Cowboy and writer, transplant from Southern Idaho, via Wyoming, and currently hanging my hat in South Dakota.

I cowboy for a living on a family cow-calf outfit near Murdo, South Dakota. We also pasture yearlings and put up all our own hay during the summer. In my spare time I write and am finishing my first novel, also I enjoy quilting and sewing.

 


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


 

March 26, 2012

Poet and teacher Jo Lynne Kirkwood and her husband Michael farm near Sigurd, Utah. She shares a photo taken earlier this month:

She writes:

This is a hayfield we put in last spring—so if there is a pot of gold (if hay prices stay high...) maybe it's here at the end of this rainbow?  The photo looks across our bottom field toward Highway 89.
 
Jo Lynne Kirkwood has an impressive four-part poem, "A Cowboy Season." Part I paints a vivid picture of a rancher's Spring:

Part I
(Spring
in the Pastures)

In March, when the calves started comin'
the ground was still covered in snow.
That night twenty gave birth the temperature hovered
somewhere around three below.

By mornin' six calves were near frozen
and ten never lurched to their feet.
They lay stiff in their membranes of ice and placenta,
and the live ones were tremblin' and weak.

Then when the sun broke over the mountain,
After that night when so many were lost,
The snow hollows crusted, the ground turned to ooze
and you started to long for the frost.

But when the mist rose off from the pasture
clouds gathered, and then the rains come.
And a deep chillin' drizzle damped the back of your neck,
and your hands were so cold they turned numb.

Then the calvin' became a true nightmare,
what with heifers just plain built too small,
calves comin' backwards, that had to be pulled,
and you wondered if it was worth it at all.

You were gruntin' and gaspin' and covered in sweat,
cussin' to drown out the pain,
Neck deep in muck and cursin' the sky,
though you knew in July you'd need rain.

Then a little feller you'd thought was left dogie
answered the bawl of his ma,
and thrustin' his head 'gainst that cow's achin' udders
he sucked life from that muddy spring thaw.

And awareness come hard, like the thunder,
with that power that deep knowin' has.
There was no other place you would rather be
than right here, in the spring, birthin' calves.

© 2001, Jo Lynne Kirkwood, excerpt from "A Cowboy Season"
This poem may not be reprinted or reposted without the author's permission.

Read the entire poem here.

 

Read more about Jo Lynne Kirkwood and more of her poetry here.

 


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


 

March 19, 2012

South Dakota cowboy and poet Ken Cook comes from a long line of respected cowboys. His boys cowboy now on a ranch that was their great grandfather's. A fifth generation, granddaughter Shyanne Adrienne, is next in line. He shares photos, along with captions and a poem.


Fifth-generation granddaughter Shyanne, feeding a bucket calf with Uncle Kiel and Uncle Korey [Ken's sons]. Kiel and Korey are now working on their Great Grandpa Buckles' old place. The Buckles family no longer owns the ranch. [See a 2007 Picture the West about Ken's Grandpa Buckles here.]



Shyanne and Pepper.  This is her horse as far as Grandpa is concerned.  He's Kelly's old roping horse.



That's Festus.  Belongs to...not really sure, been here for a few years now. 
 A proud member of the Hodson Ranch string now I guess.

 


Not Waitin' On Someday

"Someday Daddy" is all she said,
One precious want surged 'round her head.
Tiny hands caressed my saddle,
Big blue eyes cried out it's time for cattle.

You're gonna make a hand Kasey,
Not waitin' on someday.
Nothin's lived by watchin',
We're gonna ride today.

From that day on we rode through life,
Ranch work, a man, our dance, his wife.
Now her first born craves cowboy ways,
And I will ride inside her days.

She's gonna make a hand that girl,
Not waitin' on someday.
No cowgirl lags back at the house,
We're gonna ride today.

Memories explode, her Mom and I,
Swallowed hard and felt her anxious eye.
"Someday Grandpa" she clearly said,
I'll catch her horse...for what lies ahead.

You're gonna make a hand Shyanne,
Not waitin' on someday.
Nothin's lived by watchin',
We're gonna ride today.

© 2010, Ken Cook
This poem may not be reprinted or reposted without the author's permission.

This poem was written about Ken and Nancy Cook's daughter Kasey and their granddaughter Shyanne. It was a part of the 2010 National Day of the Cowboy Art Spur that featured Joelle Smith's "She's a Hand."



[Ken and his sons and son-in-law] Spring branding, with me, Kelly, Andy Dawson (Shyanne's Dad), and Kiel



 

Previously, Ken has shared other interesting Picture the West photos, including:

  2010 branding

  The "tail end" of 2007

 Branding, 2007
 
kcFrankBucklesBabeand_Dolly.jpg (73113 bytes)  "Grandpa Buckles"

Family photos in the very first Picture the West

 


Photo by Jeri L. Dobrowski

Read more about Ken Cook and some of his poetry here.

 

 


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


 

See an index of all past photos here.

Find the current photos here.

 

 

 

www.cowboypoetry.com

 

HOME

 What's New | Poems | Search

 Features | Events  

The BAR-D Roundup | Cowboy Poetry Week

Poetry Submissions 

Subscribe | Newsletter | Contact Us

  Join Us!

 

Authors retain copyright to their work; obtain an author's
permission before using a poem in any form.

 

CowboyPoetry.com is a project of the Center for Western and Cowboy Poetry, Inc., a Federal and California tax-exempt non-profit 501 (c) (3) organization.  

 

Site copyright information