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This is Page 17.

See some past weeks' photos below

See an index of all past weeks' photos here.

See Page 1 here with the current photo of the week.

 

We welcome your pictures. We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We're looking for vintage photos and contemporary photos: family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo to share, email us for information about sending it to us.

Each week, we'll post selected photos from those received. We'll also share some photos posted previously elsewhere at CowboyPoetry.com.

 

Send your photo.

 Email us for information about sending it to us.

 

 

If you enjoy this feature, you may also be interested in our 
Western Memories Project, the personal recollections— many with photos— contributed by BAR-D visitors.  Your stories and photos are welcome.


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If you have a photo to share, email us.


 

November 26,  2007


Retired pastor Billy H. Burris of Springfield, Missouri, shared this photo, taken in Montana.

He told us:

This church intrigued me greatly! It stood on a hill in Babb, Montana, just a ways from the northeast entrance to Glacier National Park. The beautiful little church just struck me when I passed it; I turned around and shot the photo from my car window. The church is on the Blackfoot Reservation.

Having preached in Hungry Horse, at Glacier Bible Camp, one of the Blackfoot Indian men had been in attendance. I was honored that at the last day of the meeting he placed a hand on my shoulders, said something in the Blackfoot tongue, and made me an "honorary Blackfoot Indian." I was honored, to say the least.

I was preaching in Hungry Horse at a camp called "West of 60's." It is a camp for Seniors, especially for those 60 years or older. There are usually from 600-800 people there.  It's usually held the last week in August. The Blackfoot" honor was conferred upon me in a bit of a "private" time right after one of the services.

We asked Rev. Burris to tell us about himself, and he replied:

I just stepped aside from pastoring Praise Assembly in Springfield, Missouri, a congregation of about 800. Been there for 23+ years. The only other church I pastored was in the large metropolis of Green Forest, Arkansas, a "large metropolis" of 1300 at the time. We pastored there 22 1/2 years. So altogether, I spent 46 years in the pastorate. The Praise congregation and Deacon Board conferred upon me the title of Pastor Emeritus, and I am still speaking there some as my successor asks me to.

All my life, I've been a cowboy at heart. I often jokingly said while pastoring, "I wish I was herding cattle instead of herding sheep." But of course, I didn't; that was my call in life. I turned 70 on September 30th, but still feel in my 50's. I live on a little 3 acre place north of Springfield. I was raised in the Arkansas River Valley, a little town called Russellville, but always had a horse while growing up. I loved to ride. Right now, I have no horses; just got rid of my mare and filly colt last year.
 

 


 Please share your photos.

If you enjoy this feature, help keep it going! Share your photos.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo to share, email us.  

 


November 19, 2007

Thanksgiving is a time for families to gather, and Paul Kern has created a podcast, "Thanksgiving Tribute to Cowboy Parents," which includes his poem, "At Codding's Place," Diane Tribitt's "Half the Hand," and Latigo's "Cattle up the Trail."

Paul Kern's writing often reflects a deep appreciation of his father, Reese Kern, who is now facing serious health challenges.

Paul is an excellent photographer and has many photos of memorable times with his father and all of his family. This year on Father's Day, we were pleased to host Paul's tribute to his father, "Reese Kern—Atomic Cowboy." We asked Paul if we share some photos for Picture the West that are particularly meaningful to him and to his father. He did that, along with a moving poem.

Paul told us:


 

This photo with the buggy (this type is called a cabriolet) was taken a few years back when I was training the palomino to drive. Dad and I are exchanging views on the subject.

 


This photo was taken in the Jedediah Smith Wilderness Area to the north of the Teton Range in the meadows right before a place called Hidden Corral. This is one of Dad's most favorite places on the planet. The fireweed was in full bloom that day. When I saw him last, he just wanted to go and be with his horses at a place near Stringtown, Colorado we call "the homestead." This poem attempts to capture that day.

 

On Smokey Before I Go 

Eighty-five and still a horseman, been a good run these long years,

He’s owned a string of good ones, but as he reins it in he hears,

Just one last ride if at all I can, on Smokey before I go.

Doc says my days are short, I suppose he’s right—I know.

 

He keeps a saddle in his truck; it forks an old grain sack.

His wife says just take it in; put it up with the other tack.

Know what I would like to do? Since for today I can’t ride,

Go up to the old homestead and watch the horses hit their stride.

 

If I rest for a couple of days, and save up the strength I lack,

Maybe I can lift that saddle up, and throw it on his back.

For today just let me be, in cool grass just sitting down,

In the company of horses, miles away from the noise of town.

 

I’ll gladly trade just one good day, with horses and sky and grass,

For the chemo and the feeding tubes and clinic with walls of glass.

Cancer caught him in its snare—it came stalking an evil way,

Where some pray to heal and others just curse the day.

 

Eighty-five and still a horseman, been a good run these long years,

He’s owned a string of good ones, but as he reins it in he hears,

Just one last ride if at all I can, on Smokey before I go.

Doc says my days are short, I know he’s rightI know.

We will be together again over Thanksgiving.

 

Paul Kern has contributed other interesting photos to "Picture the West," including:

Contemporary photos for Father's Day, 2007

Vintage photos of his grandfather

 

Read more about Paul Kern, see some of his photos, and read some of his poetry here.

 


 Please share your photos.

If you enjoy this feature, help keep it going! Share your photos.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo to share, email us.  

 


November 11, 2007

In observance of Veterans Day, journalist and photographer Jeri Dobrowski shares family photos of generations of veterans and some additional World War I photos:



William Campbell, circa 1900, Union Army veteran (great-great-grandfather)

Civil War pension document dated January 29, 1903, belonging to Mary Campbell, William's widow.  Mary’s pension as the widow of a Civil War veteran was $8/month, payable quarterly by the U.S. Pension Agent in San Francisco, Calif. It was increased to $12/month on April 19, 1908.

 


William M. Janssen, 1917, Norfolk, Virginia (paternal grandfather)

Granddad enlisted in the U.S. Navy at 20 years of age. He served aboard the USS Saranac, a minelayer working in the North Sea (built in 1899, acquired by the Navy in 1917 and decommissioned in 1919). He was hospitalized in Scotland during his 22-month enlistment, sidelined with pneumonia.


Bill sporting winter wear necessary for his 22-month deployment in the North Sea


Taken in Scotland


The only reason Granddad wasn't wearing cowboy boots—ala Wally McRae—is because he didn't have them along. I can guarantee you, if he would have had them, he would have worn them!


Returning from duty in the North Sea, Bill Janssen (second from right), celebrates the Armistice in New York City

Bill returned to eastern Montana following the war, taking up farming and ranching on a homestead claim he filed shortly before enlisting. He went on to serve as a storekeeper and the postmaster at Janssen Mercantile, Coalwood, Montana.

 


Sam Janssen, circa 1919, William Janssen's brother (paternal great uncle)
 



Jeri also shared some of her grandfather Bill's World War I photos, inspired by a November 11, 2007 article in the Billings Gazette:


Aboard USS Illinois.  Granddad noted those are 13-inch guns in the background

 


Taking on a load of mines to be laid in the North Sea

 


Laying mines from the deck of the USS Saranac

 


The caption on the back of this photo, in Granddad's hand, says: "Winter of 1918-1919,
North Sea, smoke screen during sub attack."

 

 

Jeri Dobrowski has contributed many other interesting photos to "Picture the West," including:

Family photos from Yellowstone, from the 1930s, 1940s, and 1950s

Contemporary photos for the Fourth of July

1940s-era photos about McNierney Livestock

Jeri  is working on a family history book of photos and stories. She comments, "'Picture the West' has inspired me to find out more about my family...What a way to view history and incorporate the written accounts that I am so fortunate to have!"
 

Jld07.jpg (9383 bytes) 

Read Jeri Dobrowski's Cowboy Jam Session and more about her here.

See her gallery of western performers and others at her site here.

 


 Please share your photos.

If you enjoy this feature, help keep it going! Share your photos.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo to share, email us.  

 


November 5, 2007

 

Award winning poet, radio host, and humorist Andy Nelson of Pinedale, Wyoming, sent photos of his family's next generation of farriers.

To put them in perspective, here's a photo of Andy's farrier father, Jim Nelson:

And here's a recent photo of Andy and his brother Jim, a version of which appears on Andy's Full Nelson Shoeing CD:


photo by Stuart Johnson

 

Andy told us about the photos below:

These are the pictures of the future of “Full Nelson Shoeing.” My boys Dylan (16) and Will (13) have really taken to the farrier trade, much to their father’s delight.

Now, all I have to do is sit in the lawn chair with a cold Diet Pepsi and answer an occasional question and offer unsolicited advice. It sure does bring back memories of my father Jim doing the exact same thing, only he would be sipping on an adult beverage and not a sodi pop.

One thing is certain, I believe I am as proud of my boys as my dad was of his.
 


Dylan under his horse “Mike,” with Will’s bubble-butted mare “Meg” awaiting her turn.

 


Will under his sister Abby’s 25-year-old mare, “Ginger.”

 


Dylan’s smiling face after receiving some free advice from the old man.


 


Will’s smiling face while commenting on how bad his hind end was burning!

 


I had to throw in this picture of Mike, he is quite a character. Dylan will step outside and whistle for the dog and Mike comes running.
 

 

Previously, Andy shared a 1950s family photo here; a 2005 sunset photo from his place in Pinedale, here; and a contemporary photo from his brother Jim's ranch here.

See our feature about James Nelson Sr. here.

Read some of Andy Nelson's poetry here.

Photo by Jeri L. Dobrowski; see her gallery of western performers and others here.

 

 


 Share your photos.

If you enjoy this feature, help keep it going! Share your photos.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo to share, email us.  


 

See Page 1 here with the current photo of the week.

 


 

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