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This is Page 61.

See some past weeks' photos below.

See an index of all past weeks' photos here.

See Page 1 here with the current photo of the week.

 

We welcome your pictures. We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We're looking for vintage photos and contemporary photos: family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo to share, email us for information about sending it to us.

Each week, we'll post selected photos from those received. We'll also share some photos posted previously elsewhere at CowboyPoetry.com.

 

Send your photo.

 Email us for information about sending it to us.

 

 

If you enjoy this feature, you may also be interested in our 
Western Memories Project, the personal recollections— many with photos— contributed by BAR-D visitors.  Your stories and photos are welcome.


 

 

We welcome your photos.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


previous  photos

index of all photos


November 2, 2009

Historian and musician Mark L. Gardner (www.songofthewest.com) shares photos taken in late October, 2009 of two interesting New Mexico graves. 

Mark Gardner and Rex Rideout (www.timetravelmusic.com) "perform the historic music of the Western experience using vintage instruments and historic playing styles." They had several concerts in late October, including an event in conjunction with the opening of a new exhibit at New Mexico's City of Las Vegas Museum and Rough Riders Memorial Collection. The exhibit was about the old Las Vegas Cowboys' Reunion rodeos, which began in 1915.

Mark wrote, "The title of the exhibit is "Git Fer Vegas Cowboy!," the Reunion slogan coined by Phil LeNoir." Mark has previously shared information for our feature about poet and writer Phil LeNoir (1882-1923), who has a rich history and connection with other Western writers, including Jack Thorp and S. Omar Barker (see our feature about Phil LeNoir here).

Mark writes:

I was excited about our trip to Las Vegas because I have long wanted to find the grave of LeNoir. Well, with info provided by Pat Romero of the Las Vegas Museum, we located it in the old Masonic Cemetery. I got a good picture of LeNoir's stone...


The stone reads:
Philip H. LeNoir, 1882-1923
He that overcometh shall inherit all things

Mark L. Gardner, familiar to many for his 2005 book and CD, Jack Thorp's Songs of the Cowboys, has just completed a book about Billy the Kid, To Hell on a Fast Horse: Billy the Kid, Pat Garrett, and the Epic Chase to Justice in the Old West, to be released in February, 2010 by Harper Collins. Mark writes:

....our route between Las Vegas and Clovis took us right past old Fort Sumner...so we made time to stop and look around.  I had Rex take my camera and snap a photo of me next to Billy's grave: 


The large stone reads:
Pals
Tom O'Folliard, died December 1880
William Bonney, alias "Billy the Kid," died July 1881
Charlie Bowdre, died 1880
 

There are many sources for information about this grave and previous markers, including here at the New Mexico state tourism site. The original marker did not survive.

To Hell on a Fast Horse includes this paragraph about the funeral of Billy the Kid:

The Kid's funeral took place that afternoon. Garrett had arranged with Maxwell to makes sure the body was "neatly and properly dressed." Jesus Silva constructed a crude coffin, after which he and Fort Sumner resident Vicente Otero dug a grave in the old post cemetery. The coffin was transported to the burying ground in Otero's wood wagon and was followed by a procession of nearly every resident of Fort Sumner. The words spoken over the grave came from Job, chapter 14: "Man that is born of a woman is of few days and full of trouble. he cometh forth like a flower, and is cut down: he fleeth also as a shadow and continueth not."  The next day, a marker made out of a stave from the fort's picket fence was placed at the head of the grave. Stenciled in the board's eroded surface were the words "Billy the Kid." No last name. No date. No quaint Victorian sentiment.

View a video made about the forthcoming book here on YouTube.


photo by Steve Butler

Find more about Mark L. Gardner in our feature here
and at his web site,
www.songofthewest.com.


 

   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


 

October 26, 2009

Oklahoma rancher and poet Jay Snider shared photos (taken with his cell phone) from along the Chisholm Trail. He describes them:

Lookout Point ( Monument Hill) is located north of Waurika, Oklahoma just east of the community of Addington. From that point you can see for miles along the old Chisholm Trail.

Tom Lattimore was a black cowboy who pushed cattle up the trail as a young man and his wish was to be buried overlooking the Chisholm Trail. His grave and marker are at Lookout Point.

"Millions of longhorns were driven northward across the plains to railheads in Kansas during the period 1867-1889. The great cattle drives not only helped to feed a nation just after the Civil War, they provided one of the nation's most enduring heroes—the cowboy. The brief era of the open range and free grass generated the greatest cattle boom in world history. This hill was a landmark for drivers who rode northward from the Red River to a campsite nearby."

This historic site sits on property once owned by the Price family and is now a part of the Stuart Ranch. You can still see the ruts of the Chisholm Trail from Monument Hill.

 


 


photo courtesy of TheChisholmTrail.com
 

The above photo of Lookout Point is courtesy of TheChisholmTrail.com, found here, where a history of the marker is included.

There is also history at Blog Oklahoma, and a comment about Tom Lattimore which states that his reason for wanting to be buried at the site was that "the cowboys will always be going by there and they'll stop and remember me."

Waurika, Olkahoma's Chisholm Trail Historical Museum includes "a Colt rifle once owned by trail driver Tom Lattimore."

The Chisholm Trail Heritage Center in Duncan, Oklahoma has exhibits and information.


Jay Snider has shared previous photos in Picture the West:

  Generations of Snider family cowboys in April, 2009

  Photos of Jay's mother, rodeo queen and good hand, in September, 2009

  Photos and stories about Jay's grandfather, Marvin Turner (1905-1976), who was a brand inspector for the Texas & Southwestern Cattle Raisers Association, in May, 2008

  Three generations of rodeoing Sniders, and four generations horseback in September, 2007

Jay Snider's Rafter S Ranch Cowboy Reunion in August, 2007

Read more about Jay Snider and some of his poetry here.


Photo by Jeri L. Dobrowski; see her gallery of western performers and others here.
Jay Snider, National Cowboy Poetry Gathering, Elko, Nevada 2007

 


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


 

October 19, 2009

 

Award winning poet, radio host, and humorist Andy Nelson of Pinedale, Wyoming, shares photos of his father, James W. Nelson. He writes:

"Family" seems to be the most photographed subject in any photo album. It was not until lately that I realized the importance of this trend.

My dad was gone before any of my children could get to know him, all that are left now are photographs and stories. With this in mind, I began a new book project combining my dad’s stories and old family photographs with some of my own stories and poems. The book contains a lot of the humor associated with cowboy life mixed with the realism of agrarian struggles. If all goes as planned, the book will be available sometime after the first of the year and is titled Writing with Jim.
 

Above are the children of Gus and Cora Nelson at their homestead outside of Oakley Idaho in 1920. Clara (left, sitting in the rocker) is holding my dad, Jim, with Rose and Ruth next to them. Rex is mounted on the horse. The youngest, Leah, is yet to be born.
 

Above is young Jim Nelson with Cal, the horse his father gave him after an intrepid roundup of a winter-range cavvy.

Dad’s love for horses continued through out his life. Above he is pictured with a favorite brood mare, Gotch, and her flashy colt, Whiskers.

Andy Nelson contributed an invited 2006 Father's Day piece about his father, which includes photos and stories.


 

Andy Nelson has shared other Picture the West photos:

             photos of his father and his work as a farrier here

   photos of three generations of farriers here

   photos of his family's next generation of farriers here

   a 1950s family photo here

ancloudswagon.jpg (24930 bytes)  a 2005 sunset photo from his place in Pinedale, here

  a contemporary photo from his brother Jim's ranch here.

Read some of Andy Nelson's poetry here.

Photo by Jeri L. Dobrowski; see her gallery of western performers and others here.

 

 


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


   

        

       

     

       

     

     

     

    

     

   

     

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tell us your stories!  If you have a photo to share, email us.

See an index of all past photos here.

 

 

 

 

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