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1877-1931

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Robert V. (Van Schoick) Carr, born July 15, 1877, wrote poetry and short fiction that was frequently published in Western magazines. 

The 1917 book, Literature of South Dakota, by Oscar William Coursey, includes this photo and information:


....Came to Dakota with parents in 1890. Settled at Rapid City. Attended public schools at Rapid City, also the State School of Mines located at that place. Served with South Dakota Infantry in the Philippines. Upon return home became engaged in editorial work, being associated at various times with the St. Paul Dispatch, the Chicago Evening Post and the Denver Times. Later became editor of the Whitewood (S. D.) Plaindealer. Sold out. Identified with the International Livestock Exposition Company, Chicago. Resigned. Married. Lives in Pasadena, Cal.

Robert V. Carr, known as the "cow boy poet," (although he never was a cow boy, but merely visited their camps), had published in 1902 a volume of poems called "Black Hills Ballads." These consisted of rambling verses centered mostly on frivolous themes....

His first book, Black Hills Ballads, was published in 1902 and the book's Author's Note indicates that he was in Whitewood, South Dakota. A Spanish-American War roster states he was "discharged for disability" from the 1st Infantry Regiment of the South Dakota Volunteers in April of 1899. Several poems in Black Hills Ballads refer to that period (which includes the Philippine-American war) and at least two are noted as being written in Manila in 1898, one in Honolulu in 1899, and one in Japan in 1899.

His Cowboy Lyrics book that was published in 1912 has an Author's Note that was written in Los Angeles. Other fragments in other sources mention that he lived in Arizona and that he "... had a colorful background of living with Sioux Indians, cowboy, prospector, soldier, newspaper reporter...."

In 2010, Bill Black sent information about Robert V. Carr's burial place. His grave at the Sierra Madre Pioneer Cemetery in Los Angeles County, California indicates that he died in 1931. Find the burial information and some additional information here.

Census information shows he lived with his wife Estella in Los Angeles County in 1910, 1920, and 1930. His World War I Draft Card Registration yielded his birthdate (July 16, 1877) and the "Van Schoick" name that he represented with the "V." in Robert V. Carr.

Recently, much more about Robert V. Carr has come to light.

Carl Steiger, who has researched Robert V. Carr for a special project about Seth Bullock's Cowboy Brigade, of which Carr was a member, shared a link to this large collection of information about Carr here. Includes is this quote and cautionary tale by Carr, from a 1913 article:

I believe I was about 14 years old when, in addition to an overpowering ambition to be a cowboy, I began to cherish fond hopes of becoming a writer. Possessing a couple of Indian ponies, I drifted from ranch to ranch, from cow outfit to cow outfit, and when I was not annoying the cooks, I was scribbling poetry. Some of those verses I sent to a country editor. He returned them with a note to the effect that they were not worth space. Years later that editor transgressed the law and was sent to jail. That served as an awful warning to me, and later, when I became a country newspaper editor, I always published the poetry sent in.

See our feature about Seth Bullock's Cowboy Brigade, which also includes a poem that Carr wrote as the "official poet" for the band of cowboys who were invited to President Theodore Roosevelt's 1905 inaugural parade.

We welcome additional information. Email us.

In his essay, "A Poetry of Exile." in Cowboy Poets and Cowboy Poetry, Hal Cannon comments that Carr was among some authors of the time who "wrote a good deal of poetry for the popular market, and it shows in their subjects and style."  

A list of Robert V. Carr's books is included below and there are a few additional links.

 

Poems

Books

A Few Links and More...

 

Poet and reciter Bill Black, who includes Robert V. Carr poems in his programs and on his Classic Western Poetry recording (and who assisted in this feature) writes, "...One thing to note from Carr is an expression of the range of the West. He writes of not only the cowboy and rancher, but also of the Native American and homesteader. He writes of events from multiple points of view in the same poem yet the poem is short and clear. He recreates the attack of wolves on cattle in a way that strikes a very responsive chord to ranchers in the areas where the Mexican Grey Wolf has been reintroduced. His work seems to poetically present the same message introduced by Fredrick Jackson Turner in 1893. The same echo is also often found in the work of E. A. Brininstool."

 


 

Photo from Black Hills Ballads

 


Poems

 

The Old Cowboy's Lament

When Dutchy Plays the Mouth Harp

Prairie Wolves

Yesterday

In Search of Local Color

The Chuck Wagon

Baldy Joe's Simple Little Rhyme

The Tryst  (separate page)

Real Affection  (separate page)


(See our feature about Seth Bullock's Cowboy Brigade, which also includes a poem that Carr wrote as the "official poet" for the band of cowboys who were invited to President Theodore Roosevelt's 1905 inaugural parade.)

 

The Old Cowboy's Lament

The range's filled up with farmers and there's fences ev'rywhere
     A painted house 'most ev'ry quarter mile
They're raisin' blooded cattle and plantin' sorted seed
     And puttin' on a painful lot o' style

There hain't no grass to speak of and the water holes are gone
     The wire of the farmer holds 'em tight
There's little use to law 'em and little use to kick
     And mighty sight less use there is to fight

There's them coughin' separaters and their dirty, dusty crews
     And wagons runnin' over with the grain
With smoke a-driftin' upward and writin' on the air
     A story that to me is mighty plain

The wolves have left the country and the long-horns are no more
     And all the game worth shootin' at is gone
And it's time for me to foller, 'cause I'm only in the way
     And I've got to be a-movin'ómovin' on

by Robert V. Carr,  from  Cowboy Lyrics, 1908

 

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When Dutchy Plays the Mouth Harp

When Dutchy plays th' mouth harp,
     All th' fellers gather 'round
An' help on with th' music,
     By a-stompin' on th' ground;
And th' cook he cuts a shuffle,
     An' the night hawk pats his hand,
When Dutchy plays th' mouth harp,
     In a way to beat th' band.

When Dutchy plays th' mouth harp,
     An' we've cached our chuck away,
An' a-feelin' mighty foxy
     An' a-feelin' mighty gay,
There's nothin' we like better
     Than to lend a pattin' hand,
When Dutchy plays th' mouth harp,
     In a way to beat th' band.

When Dutchy plays th' mouth harp--
     Plays a cake walk might fine--
'Tis then us ole cowpunchers
     Come a-stepin' down th' line;
Around th' fire shufflin'
     An' a-pattin' of th' hand,
When Dutchy plays th' mouth harp,
     In a way to beat th' band.

by Robert V. Carr,  from  Ballads of the Badlands, 1902

 

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Prairie Wolves

Up where the white bluffs fringe the plain,
When heaven's lights are on the wane;
They sing their songs as demons might
Shriek wild a chorus to the night.
Gaunt, gray brutes with dripping fangs,
And eyes a-flame with hunger pangs;
With lips curled back in snarls of hate,
They wail a curse against their fate.

by Robert V. Carr,  from  Ballads of the Badlands, 1902

 

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In Search of Local Color

Loafin' Jim
I nicknamed him,
'Twas 'bout the same old deal
Of all th' West
That's sort o' blest
With speakin' as they feel.

He never'd seem
To even dream
Of liftin' of his hand,
An' lazy--pshaw!
You never saw
His equal in the land.

'Twas his way
To never stay
Around where hard work wuz,
An' twas his style
To set an' smile
An' tell me that becuz

Th' world knowed
To him she owed
A livin' by th' way
It weren't his part
To sweat an' smart
Fet it th' live-long day.

Loafin' Jim
I nicknamed him,
'Til he left campe one day,
An' 'fore he went
Jes' kindly spent
Some dust a-treatin' way;

'N sort o' laffs
An' kinder gaffs
Me where I least suspec's--
"I write," sez he,
"Them books, you see
An' you go in my nex'!"

by Robert V. Carr,  from  Ballads of the Badlands, 1902

 

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Yesterday

Old Yesterday hain't no more use
Than rubber boots be to a goose;
So saddle up and ride away
From that there worthless Yesterday.
Hook your spurs in the Bronk o' Hope,
And hit a high and swingin' lope
Across the Range-o'-things-that are,
And leave that Old Past so blamed far
Behind that you can't even view
It thro' a glass, if you want to.
Your failures - shucks! ferget 'em all,
Don't let 'em know you hear 'em call;
Look up and see the rainbow smile.
To-day's the only time worth while.

by Robert V. Carr,  from  Cowboy Lyrics, 1912

Our thanks to Bill Black for sending this poem, which he comments is "...a poem that seemed to sum up his major style of writing and his message.  It is found in the "Cowboy Philosophy" section of Cowboy Lyrics.  

 

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The Chuck Wagon

     Cowpuncher's cafay,
     It is that-o-way,
An' we strike it kerslam 'bout three times
          a day;
     When the cook yells, "Come get it!"
     He don't have to please,
"Hi yip! all you logies, come gather your feed." 

by Robert V. Carr,  from  Cowboy Lyrics, 1908

This poem is included in our "poems about chuckwagons and such"

 

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Baldy Joe's Simple Little Rhyme

Oh, I know an ole cowpuncher, an' they call him Baldy Joe,
B'cause his hair is somethin' that is absent, don't you know;
An' he sits up in th' saddle, sort o' lives there all th' time,
An' a-hummin' an a-hummin' this here simple little rhyme:

There hain't no sense
   Like a logie fer to sit,
'Cause you think you hain't a-gittin'
   What you think you orter git.
So it's quit your jawin',
   Keep a-cinchin' up your grip,
An' brace yourself an' allers
Keep a tight rein on your lip.

Joe is a queerish critter, he's a mighty funny man;
Never has a speck o' trouble, an' you never, never can
Hear him kickin' or complainin', 'cause he's happy all the timeó
Jes' a-hummin' an' a-hummin' this here simple little rhyme:

There hain't no sense
   Like a logie fer to sit,
'Cause you think you hain't a-gittin'
   What you think you orter git.
So it's quit your jawin',
   Keep a-cinchin' up your grip,
An' brace yourself an' allers
Keep a tight rein on your lip.

Bin a-thinkin' an' a-thinkin' if th' world was fashioned so,
'Twould tally with th' hummin' of that happy feller Joe;
She'd be a blamed sight better, git some better all th' time,
'Cause there's a scad o' hoss sense in his simple little rhyme:

There hain't no sense
   Like a logie fer to sit,
'Cause you think you hain't a-gittin'
   What you think you orter git.
So it's quit your jawin',
   Keep a-cinchin' up your grip,
An' brace yourself an' allers
Keep a tight rein on your lip.

by Robert V. Carr, from Black Hills Ballads,  1902



Books


Robert V. Carr wrote the following books:

    Black Hills Ballads    Denver: Reed Publishing Co., 1902

   Cowboy Lyrics,  Chicago: W.B. Conkey Co., 1908

   Cowboy Lyrics, Roundup edition   Boston: Small, Maynard & Co., 1912

 


  Black Hills Ballads    Denver: Reed Publishing Co., 1902

 

 

The Author's Note to this book:

The poems contained in this volume have appeared in Collier's Weekly, Overland Monthly, The Dakotan, Chicago Post, Sioux City Journal, St. Paul Dispatch, Deadwood Pioneer-Times, Cripple Creek Star, and the Denver Times.  To the editors of these publications, who have assisted me in gathering my scattered stalks of poesy into a single sheaf, I am greatly indebted.
                                                                                                  Robert V. Carr
                                                                              Whitewood, S. D., November, 1902

The Dedication:

To the people of the Black Hills of South Dakota
this volume is most sincerely dedicated
with the hope that they may find as much joy in the
reading as the author has found in the writing

 

Contents (a few poems note the date and place they were written, and those notes are included below):

Part 1
Little Feller-- Child of the Sunset Country
Kick of the Ranch Hand
Badly Joe's Simple Little Rhyme
Love of Bill Haines
A Matter of Opinion
Cowboy's Salvation Song
Dance, You Punchers, Dance
Loafin' Time
Fishin' in the Shade
Springtime on th' Range
The Light of the Smiles in Her Eyes
Yes, Ma She Cried
A Word from the Old Prospector
When Dutchy Plays the Mouth Harp
The Don't Care Man
Almos' Time fer Fishin'
When a Man Has Money
Fer I'm a Boy
A Feller Git's Dreamy Once in a While
Lullaby in Hesperia
An Eastern Farmer in the Black Hills
Cowboy's Trail-Song
Partiality
Down at Haller's Dancin'
Romance of the Range
She Tamed Him
Let's Quit Quarrelin' fer Awhile
The Kind he Wanted
When It's Gittin' Plantin' Time
In Search of Local Color
Out West
Time's Heavy Hand
Let's Go Back
This Meller Autumn Weather
Holoway
Not Built that Way
Them White Fairees
A Westerner's Lament
Homesickness (Manila, 1898)
The Way of the Regular (Manila, 1898)
Makers of Men
The Roses the Florist Didn't Keep
When She Goes to Git th' Mail
You'd Better Keep A-Smilin'

Part II
Dawn in the Black Hills
The Pines Sing Wild and the Winds Are Free
On the Trail to Sleepyville
Green Prairies
June in the Hills
Silhouette in Sepia
Welcome, Miss May
Flood-Song of the Mountains
Legend of the Chinook
Ah, There, Miss Violet
The Shameless Stream
Prairie Wolves
The Rattlesnake
March on the Plains
The Western Trail
Silences of the Night
Honolulu ("Honolulu, 1899")
Just for You
Pictures Three

Part III
The Songs I'd Like to Sing
The Good in the Sorrow
When She Plays
The Doom of the Loiterer
The Welcome One
The Best
Tears
To the Only One
The Coat in the Pawnshop Door
You Went Away
Just Yesterday
Dreams You Dream
The World's Desire
Thy Voice
Her Eyes
The Roses of Love
I Have Sang to Thee, Love
Perhaps
A Song of Hope
Sister Mine
Onjinjintka
To a Manila Mestiza  ("Written on the Steps of a Temple back of Nagasaki, Japan, May, 1899)
Story of Little Feller  (prose)

 

 


 

   Cowboy Lyrics Chicago: W.B. Conkey Co., 1908  

 

 

DEDICATION

He spoke of his home country like a man talkin' 'bout an old friend--Lem Scobey.

To you, old pard, a hearty "How." Thou knowest I have not forgotten. Thou knowest that some day I will be with you, and, as of yore, we will ride through the rain of a summer's day, or, in the keen of October, feel the wind of the western mountians in our faces.  Perhaps, it will be a strange range, and we will hae to cross the Great Divide before we reach the "Home Ranch," but believe me, boy, I'll be there--I'll be there.  And, when we meet, you will say unto me, quaintly and with the light of a great happiness in your face: "You miserable son-of-a-gun, I'm tickled to death to see you."  After which you will strike me rudely on the shoulder and call me many strange names.  Then your bed will be my bed, your chuck my chuck and your tobacco my tobacco.                                                                                   R. V. C.

Chicago, 1908

 

Contents

Dedication
The End of the Trail

RANCH AND RANGE

The Old Cowboy's Lament
The Irrigator
The Smell of Sage Brush in the Mornin'
Father and Son
Waterloo of Poker Bills
When Dutchy Plays the Mouth Harp
The Bronco Buster
A Cowboy in the City
Roobiyat of Pigin-Toed Pete
Doc Pierce's Choice
An Oracle of the Plains
The Widow's Lot
The Chuck Wagon
Branding Pen Gossip
In the Gumbo
Hank Laimer's Kid
Animal Rhymes
The Man of the Ranch
Tamed
Springtime on the Range
Down at Haller's Dancin'
A Moral-less Tale
Kick of the Ranch Hand
A Fragment
Baldy Joe's Simple Rhyme
A Coarse Lack of Appreciation
Cowboy's Salvation Song
The Boys are Comin' to Town
A Sunshine Song
The Would-be Cowpuncher
Jim Davis and the Bicycle Man
Jed Williams
The Nifty Cowpuncher
The Cowboy and the Stork
Ranch Lullaby
A Tribute to the Doctor
To a Cowboy Poet
Post Mortum Politeness
Jawin' Jane
A Cowboy on Religion
The paper Man
Lem Scobey's Opinion
Ballade of Miss Susan O'Toole
Advice from the Range
When it's Gettin' Plantin' Time
Spring
Let's Quit Quarrelin' fer Awhile
When a Man Has Money
A Cowboy Fatalist
The Old Cowman
Holoway
A Little Ax to Grind
A Word from Shorty
Dance, You Punchers, Dance
Doc Pierce's Way
A Light Joke
The Old Cowboy's Complaint

ON THE TRAIL OF LOVE

That There Girl
Speakin' of Her Eyes
Them Heap Big Thoughts
That Scrub
She Writes a Note
Her Hands
Confidential
To Dance with Her
Speakin' of Arms
The Tryst
Jes' A-foolin'
Real Affection
A Cowboy's Resolution
Bashfulness
Trail Song
An' a Two-step's What They Play
Partiality
A Romance of the Range
An Ode to the Slow Horse
True Love
Time's Heavy Hand
Plato Disputed
When She Goes to Get the mail
The Princess of Desire
The Man You Couldn't Get
Sary
A Lothario of the Range
Boy, Will You Care?

WHERE THE CHINOOK BLOWS

Green Prairies
The Ranch House
The Spring Roundup
The Camp's Asleep
Twilight on the Range
The Crocus
Tiger Lilies
Sage Brush
The Bad Lands
The Rattlesnake
The Buttes
Prairie Wolves
The Winds of the West

ON THE TRAIL OF YESTERDAY

Onjinjintka
The Gun Fight
Love and Death
The Western Trail
To a Buffalo Skull
At the Grave of a Border Cavalier
The Doom of the Weak
The Night Stampede
The Circle
In Passing
Dear Little Fire



Alphabetical Contents

Advice from the Range
An' A Two-Step's What They Play
Animal Rhymes
At the Grave of a Border Cavalier
The Bad Lands
Baldy Joe's Simple Rhyme
Ballade of Miss Susan O'Toole
Bashfulness
Boy, Will You Care?
The Boys Are Comin' to Town
Branding Pen Gossip
The Bronco Buster
The Buttes
The Camp's Asleep
The Chuck Wagon
The Circle
A Coarse Lack of Appreciation
Confidential
The Cowboy and the Stork
A Cowboy Fatalist
A Cowboy in the City
A Cowboy on Religion
A Cowboy's Resolution
Cowboy's Salvation Song
The Crocus
Dance, You Punchers, Dance
Dear Little Fire
Doc Pierce's Choice
Doc Pierce's Way
The Doom of the Weak
Down at Haller's Dancin'
The End of the Trail
Father and Son
A Fragment
Green Prairies
The Gun Fight
Hank Laimer's Kid
Her Hands
Holoway
In the Gumbo
In Passing
The Irrigator
Jawin' Jane
Jed Williams
Jes' A-Foolin'
Jim Davis and the Bicycle Man
Kick of the Ranch Hand
Lem Scobey's Opinion
Let's Quit Quarrelin' Fer Awhile
A Light Joke
A Little Ax to Grind
A Lothario of the Range
Love and Death
The Man of the Ranch
The Man You Couldn't Get
A Moral-Less Tale
The Nifty Cowpuncher
The Night Stampede
An Ode to the Slow Horse
The Old Cowboy's Complaint
The Old Cowboy's Lament
The Old Cowman
Onjinjintka
An Oracle of the Plains
The Paper Man
Partiality
Plato Disputed
Post Mortum Politeness
Prairie Wolves
The Princess of Desire
The Ranch House
Ranch Lullaby
The Rattlesnake
Real Affection
Roobiyat of Pigin-Toed Pete
A Romance of the Range
Sage Brush
Sary
She Writes a Note
The Smell of the Sage Brush in the Mornin'
Speakin' of Arms
Speakin' of Her Eyes
Spring
The Spring Roundup
Springtime on the Range
A Sunshine Song
Tamed
That Scrub
That There Girl
Them Heap Big Thoughts
Tiger Lilies
Time's Heavy Hand
To a Buffalo Skull
To A Cowboy Poet
To Dance with Her
Trail Song
A Tribute to the Doctor
True Love
The Tryst
Twilight on the Range
Waterloo of Poker Bills
The Western Trail
When a Man Has Money
When Dutchy Plays the Mouth Harp
When It's Gettin' Plantin' Time
When She Goes to Get the Mail
The Winds of the West
The Would-Be Cowpuncher
The Widow's Lot
A Word from Shorty


  Cowboy Lyrics, Roundup edition   Boston: Small, Maynard & Co., 1912

Bill Black provided the author's note from this edition:

This, the 1912 Roundup Edition, is the only complete, revised and authorized collection of poems under the title of "Cowboy Lyrics" ever published. In 1908 the author distributed a gift edition of "Cowboy Lyrics" among his friends in the western cattle country. That edition was printed solely for private circulation. The present edition contains a majority of the poems in the 1908 gift book, as well as many new verses, and late poems reprinted from magazines.

"When Cowboys Jest," "Cowboy Philosophy," "Love Lyrics of a Ranch Girl," and three shorter poems originally appeared in The Popular Magazine.

"Land Hunger," "Cowboy in the City," "Maw's Rule," and "The Cattleman's Neighbor" first appeared in The New Story Magazine.

"Voice of the Wolf" and "Lonely, Hunted Men" originally appeared in Sunset.

The editors and publishers of the above named magazines are hereby heartily thanked for courtesies extended to the author in this roundup of his strays.

                                                                                         R. V. C.
                                                                                         Los Angeles, California
                                                                                         May 1, 1912

 

 

 

Contents

How

RANCH AND RANGE

Comin' to Town
The Old Cowboy's Song
Bill Haller's Dance
Waterloo of Poker Bills
Unappreciated
Saddling Up
The Roundup Musician
Night Guard Croon
Good-By, Steer
Broke
The Would-Be Cowpuncher
Springtime on the Range
Lonesomeville
Badly Joe
Bronco Buster Repartee
Cowboy's Salvation Song
The Commission Man
The Roundup Cook
The Paper Man
Smell of Sage
To a Pack Horse
A Cowboy in the City
A Cowboy Fatalist
Tamed
A Tribute to the Doctor
The Cowboy and the Stork
Ranch Lullaby
Maw's Rule
Little Feller
The Widow's Lot
Sleepin' Out
Branding Pen Gossip
Old-Timer
Plannin' to Stay
Mud and Miracles
The Cattleman's Neighbor
Land Hunger
The Old Cowboy's Lament

WHEN COWBOYS JEST

Tenderfoot
Enlightenment
Nightmare
Explanation
Challenged
Hopelessness
Relief
Suspicion
Puzzlement
Pork?
Optimistic
Learning
Seasoned

COWBOY PHILOSOPHY

Education
Worry
Salvation
Snobbery
Yesterday

ON THE TRAIL OF LOVE

     LOVE LYRICS OF A COWBOY

Helpless
Weary
"Dear"
Humility
Doubt
Moonshine
Range o' Dreams
Idolatry
Fame
"Hoppy-Toad"
Astronomy
Jealousy
Reformation
Telepathy
"Maw"
Sacred
Sad
Ignorance
Sensitive
Loneliness
Gentleness
Retrospection
Loyalty
Inconsistency
Light o' Love
Contentment
Devotion
Loco
Paw
June
Puzzled
Responsibility
Congratulations

     RANCH GIRL LOVE LYRICS

Introduced
"Strays"
Indifference
Dumbness
Sweet
Dreams
Disappointment
Trail Talk
Pride
Buggy Riding
Evelyn
Heart Song
Bittersweet
Grand!
Paternal
Appreciation
Daydreams
Ghosts
Day o' Days
Words
Correspondence
Engaged
Confessional
Antenuptial

     THE PRINCESS OF DESIRE

The Princess of Desire

THE HOMESTEADER

Home
Breaking
After Thrashing
The Children
The Picnic
The New House
The Ditch-Digger
Plantin' Time
Plaint of the Hired Hand
If She'd a-Lived

THE INDIAN

The Western Trail
Woman-Who-Wails
Good Meat for All
Children in the Sun
The War Dance
Onjinjintka

SOMBER-LAND

Winds of the West
Flood Song
Sagebrush
The Buttes
The Bad Lands
Twilight on the Range

TRAIL'S END

Dear Little Fire
Cheyenne, Cheyenne
At Wild Bill's Grave
The Stampede
The Spring Roundup
In Passing
A Cowboy to His Mother
The Ranch House
The Doom of the Weak
Silhouette in Sepia
Lonely, Hunted Men
To a Rattlesnake
Sweetheart-Pretty-Girl
The Voice of the Wolf
To a Buffalo Skull
The Eternal Circle
Trail's End


A Few Links and More

 

   Poet and reciter Bill Black, who helped greatly with this feature, has recorded three of Robert V. Carr's poems on his Classic Western Poetry CD: "The Spring Round Up," "An Oracle of the Plains," and "The End of the Trail."  See Bill Black's web site for additional information.


Click to view at Amazon.com  Cowboy Love Poetry : Verse from the Heart of the West an anthology by editors Paddy Calistro, Jack Lamb, Jean Penn, and Waddie Mitchell, contains 10 poems by Robert V. Carr: "A Romance of the Range," "An' A Two-Step's What They Play," "Down at Haller's Dancin'," "Love Lyrics of a Cowboy," "The Man You Couldn't Get," "Real Affection," "That There Girl," "Them Heap Big Thoughts," "Time's Heavy Hand," and "To Dance With Her." 

See our Anthology Index for a list of all of the poems and poets in this book.


  Poems of the Old West, an anthology edited by Levette J. Davidson (1951, The University of Colorado Press) includes ten of Carr's poems, collected from his books.


The Cabot's Pueblo Museum site includes a photo of Robert V. Carr and some description, including, "....  Bob was a successful writer of western fiction...[he] had a colorful background of living with Sioux Indians, cowboy, prospector, soldier, newspaper reporter...."


Robert V. Carr wrote many stories that were published in periodicals, and he is listed at the Fiction Mags Index site as "Explorer, adventurer, writer. Lived in Arizona."  There are over 40 stories listed, written from 1911-1931.


In a Spanish-American War roster (posted at a Rootsweb site, which says "This roster appears in Chapter LXXVI of History of South Dakota by Doane Robinson, Vol. I (1904), pages 426-454...") Sergeant Robert V. Carr, then 21,  is listed as having been in the 1st Infantry Regiment of the South Dakota Volunteers, and "discharged for disability" in April of 1899.

The 1st infantry served in the Philippines during the Spanish American War and the Philippine American War.  See a history of the regiment here.


In December, 2005 some copies of The Jawbone, a periodical "by Robert V. Carr," were listed on eBay. The description read, "Great find for the collector of early Western writers. These 3 original issues of The Jawbone were published at Whitewood SD, copyright 1905 by Robert V. Carr (author of Black Hills Ballads and Cowboy Lyrics). Each is 4 1/2" by 6", illustrated paper wraps, bound with string.  Issues are: Vol. II, No. 4 March 1905 (32 pages uncut); Vol. II, No. 5 April 1905 (32 pages uncut); Vol. III, No. 4 Sept. 1905 (29 pages plus small advertising section)."

 

 

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